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Free «The Breakfast Club» Essay Sample

The Breakfast Club is a movie written and directed by John Hughes. The 1985 American teen drama stars were Emilio Estevez (as Andrew Clark), Molly Ringwald (as Claire Standish), Anthony Michael Hall (as Brian Johnson), Paul Gleason (as Richard Vernon), Judd Nelson (as John Bender), Ally Sheedy (as Allison Reynolds), and John Kapelos (as Carl Reed).

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The plot tracks five teenage students at imaginary Shermer High School in Shermer, Illinois as they are made to present themselves for detention in a library on March 24, 1984, a Saturday. Though the five teenagers are not total strangers, they are each from a dissimilar circle or social clique. In these circumstances, the five are forced to make the best of their situation; they learn to appreciate those around them. Despite their early differences, they in reality share many ordinary thoughts and tribulations. Throughout the length, the nine-hour Saturday lock-up, the five youngsters are changed from people who do not completely know each other to confidantes. After reporting, they are scolded and commanded not to converse or leave their chairs by the aggressive principal, Richard Vernon. The students are to stay in detention from 7:06 AM, as indicated by a clock that is 20 minutes ahead, to 4PM; a total of eight hours and fifty-four minutes.

The principle orders each of him or her to write a 1,000-word article concerning what every student thinks they are and leaves them generally with no supervision, only intermittently checking on them. Bender, who has a negative association with Mr. Vernon, ignores the regulations and irritates the others; ridiculing Brian and Andrew, and harassing Claire sexually. Allison stays abnormally calm excluding the sporadic arbitrary explosions. The five pass up time in various ways but progressively open up and disclose their inner selves. Nevertheless, in spite of the budding camaraderie the students fear that as soon as the detention is over, they will go back to their original circles and not talk to each other ever again.

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At the call and consent of the five students, Brian is requested to write down the article Mr. Vernon asked them to write before. The article he is asked to write faces up to Mr. Vernon and his preconceived views about them. Brian does so, but he does not write on the real topic rather, he writes an extremely inspiring letter that is the main point of the film. He signs off the article as "The Breakfast Club" and places it at the desk for the principle to read after they have left. There are two letters; one reads at the start and the other at the end, and they are different. The difference illustrates the shift in the students' views of each other and their awareness that they really share common things.

 
 
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A review of the best brought out aspects of the movies will ultimately center on the script and the characterization. This review focuses on the characterization of the cast. Anthony Michael Hall is represented as a nerd whose clumsiness disguises a gloomy internal dissatisfaction. Emilio Estevez is presented as a bad-tempered jock collapsing under the burden of his father's anticipations. Allison says of him, "he can't think for himself." Molly Ringwald appears as a lip-glossed spoiled drama queen and the school's popular girl. Ally Sheedy is portrayed as an outcast and the almost silent obscure jockey who needs no renovation. She claims to be in detention not because she earned it but "has nothing better to do."

Most remarkably, Judd Nelson is portrayed as the thuggish John Bender. According to the film, he comes from an economically less fortunate family and is a mistreated kid. He is full of anger over his life situation and social status. If not for this rebel without a cause, the other characters possibly would have stayed in their seats silently in the library and finally written the paper as assigned by the principle. His mockery and antagonism ignites the dialogues and disagreements that constitute most of the film. Bender is by far the most convincing of the films five fundamental characters. The characters are when forced into detention appearing to be diverse persons. Hughes establishes them as conventional stereotypes, and then gradually strips off the layers, showing how each undergoes shockingly related issues.

A theme that is evidently running through the film is the basic prejudice and stupidity of grownups. This is manifested in numerous ways, from the noticeable e.g. the mean principle (Paul Gleason), who gets drunk s in his control, to the understated e.g. the teenagers fearing the likelihood that they may mature and turn out like their parents.

"The Breakfast Club" will at all time be a relevant as there will be a certain group of people at any given time who relate to it. Everybody who has gone through high school will make out the parallels to their experiences. It will generate a more relating experience. The film defines a complete period of cinematography; it will be watched for years. The soundtrack is excellent. The single from 'Simple Minds', 'Don't You Forget about Me' is a perfect fit. The film is as a classic of its era. The film is a warm, perceptive, and extremely humorous glance into the personal lives of adolescents. "The Breakfast Club" as a film, is highly recommended.

   

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